Economics & Morality

Some partial backups of posts from the past (Feb, 2004)
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Cory Duchesne
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Re: Economics & Morality

Post by Cory Duchesne » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:21 pm

It's clear to me now. Those who have been devalued, excessively, lack value in the eyes of others, for reasons to do with

a) fertility

b) virility.

Some nations are perceived to have neither of those things.

It's good to keep in mind what coach John Wooden once asked:

Why do so many people wish to build up the weak by tearing down the strong?

While we do our good deeds, let's keep in mind that it's better a man be small but self sufficient, than artificially inflated so that he may appear to be an equal with a man or nation which he cannot be equal to.
Last edited by Cory Duchesne on Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Patrick Watts
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Re: Economics & Morality

Post by Patrick Watts » Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:13 am

It boils down to this.

Currency is worth buying when your country is worth visiting. I travelled to America once. Why? Because there was a situation there that I thought was worth experiencing. I travelled to Switzerland for the same reason. I don't regret it. In both instances I had to buy (trade) currency so I could enjoy those countries.

The first point you have to understand:

Nations with distinct currencies are like personalities. If your personality is downtrodden, burnt-out, exploited, and ravaged... then who wants anything to do with you? Generally speaking, only very empathetic and relatively unpowerful grass-roots hippies will pay attention to you. A philosopher like myself would offer assistance if you told me specifically what the issue was.

Your value is low, so only extremely poor (and/or saint-like) people will deal with you.

However, if you are a nation with a robust and powerful personality, full of fertility and virility, then you'll attract people who have a similar energy. Strength gathers with strength.

Basically, the reason why currency is important is because powerful people enjoy visiting exotic and powerful places where there is either a) enjoyment to be had. b) business opportunities to be had.

These fancy economic terms are there just to confuse and overwhelm the mind, to plaster over the reality that nations are a reflection of a hierarchy of souls.

Currency is worth buying when your country is worth visiting. If too many people are in line to visit your country or do business with your country, the value of your currency gets pushed up.

An analogy for why currency goes up in value is air conditioning. If a room gets too hot, you turn up the coldness. Value is created through intelligent, reasoned tension. Devaluation occurs through loosening, disarray and loss. Pretty basic.

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mental vagrant
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Re: Economics & Morality

Post by mental vagrant » Mon Nov 12, 2012 9:26 am

Cory Duchesne wrote:It's clear to me now. Those who have been devalued, excessively, lack value in the eyes of others, for reasons to do with

a) fertility

b) virility.

Some nations are perceived to have neither of those things.

It's good to keep in mind what coach John Wooden once asked:

Why do so many people wish to build up the weak by tearing down the strong?

While we do our good deeds, let's keep in mind that it's better a man be small but self sufficient, than artificially inflated so that he may appear to be an equal with a man or nation which he cannot be equal to.
The future of known, human and, some animal life depends on it.
unbound

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Unidian
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Re: Economics & Morality

Post by Unidian » Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:01 am

Show me capitalism.
Show me socialism. And if you point to North Korea, USSR, or any of the other usual suspects, I'll know you are misinformed on the matter.
I live in a tub.

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